Category: Science

  • Sandra Day O’Connor, first woman to serve on Supreme Court, announces probable Alzheimer’s diagnosis

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    “I am no longer able to participate in public life,” O’Connor wrote in a letter addressed to “friends and fellow Americans.” Sandra Day O’Connor, the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, announced Tuesday that she had been diagnosed with the beginning stages of dementia “some time ago,” and likely has Alzheimer’s disease. “As […]

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  • Mission to Mercury: BepiColombo spacecraft ready for launch

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    Europe and Japan are set to launch their joint mission to Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun. The partners have each contributed a probe to be despatched on an Ariane rocket from French Guiana. The duo, together known as BepiColombo, are bolted to one another for the seven-year cruise to their destination, and will […]

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  • ‘Vampire burial’ reveals efforts to prevent child’s return from grave

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    The discovery of a 10-year-old’s body at an ancient Roman site in Italy suggests measures were taken to prevent the child, possibly infected with malaria, from rising from the dead and spreading disease to the living. The skeletal remains, uncovered by archaeologists from the University of Arizona and Stanford University, along with archaeologists from Italy, […]

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  • Cats v. Rats? In New York, the Rats Win

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    At a recycling plant in Brooklyn, fat, stealthy rats were more than a match for feral cats, scientists found. New York rats are big and bad. They sit calmly on the subway tracks, ignoring discomfited commuters on the platform. They stroll through Central Park as if they owned the place. They pretty much rule the […]

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  • Rapid response needed to limit global warming

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    Summary for Policymakers of IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C approved by governments Limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society, the IPCC said in a new assessment. With clear benefits to people and natural ecosystems, limiting global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2°C […]

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  • Surprising chemical complexity of Saturn’s rings changing planet’s upper atmosphere

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    Political humorist Mark Russell once joked, “The scientific theory I like best is that the rings of Saturn are composed entirely of lost airline luggage.” Well, there’s no luggage, it turns out. But a new study appearing in Science based on data from the final orbits last year of NASA’s Cassini spacecraft shows the rings of Saturn […]

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  • Nobel winner fought for drug company interest in cancer discovery

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    James Allison knew he was onto something: He and colleagues had found a compound that acted as a brake on immune system cells called T-cells. His colleagues wanted to investigate this protein as a gateway to treating autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. But Allison had another target in mind: cancer. What if you could […]

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  • The Science of Eco-Friendly Nanoparticles!

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    Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a nanoparticle type for novel use in artificial photosynthesis by adding zinc sulfide on the surface of indium-based quantum dots. These quantum dots produce clean hydrogen fuel from water and sunlight — a sustainable source of energy. They introduce new eco-friendly and powerful materials to solar photocatalysis. […]

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  • Neil Armstrong Walked on the Moon. To These Boys, He Was Just Dad.

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    With an upcoming auction of the astronaut’s keepsakes, his sons reflect on an unusual childhood. DALLAS — In the summer of 1969, Rick Armstrong was 12 and whacking the baseball in the Houston-area Little League. He was selected to play in the all-star game — but he had to skip it, because he was at Cape Canaveral […]

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  • Cold severity linked to bacteria living in your nose

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    In news with several layers of weird, researchers have determined that the mix of bacteria that live inside your nose — yes, there are organisms living inside your nose — correlates with the type and severity of cold symptoms you develop. For example, people whose noses are rich in Staphylococcusbacteria had more severe nasal symptoms than […]

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